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10 Best Places to Visit in Japan

In days of yore, the samurai country of Japan tried to conquer the world through warfare. Today it is conquering the world with its technology, its superbly made two- and four-wheeled motor vehicles and through the hearts of all who visit it. This island nation has it all: deeply rooted cultural traditions, ancient shrines and temples, lovely gardens, beautiful mountain scenery, geishas and tea ceremonies, and accommodations that range from ryokans or quaint inns to ultra-modern luxurious hotels. An overview of the best places to visit in Japan:

10. Koya-san
Koya-sanflickr/alq666

Koya-san or Mount Koya is the most important site in Shingon Buddhism, a sect that has been practiced in Japan since 805 when it was introduced by Kobo Daishi. It remains the headquarters for the sect and the small town that grew up around the temple. The site of Kobo Daishi’s mausoleum, this wooded Mount Koya is also the starting and ending place of the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage. Tourists can get a taste of the monk’s life here as they are allowed to stay overnight in the temple.

9. Ishigaki
Ishigakiflickr/Kzaral

Located west of Okinawa, Ishigaki is Japan’s premier beach destination and makes a good base to explore the other islands in the Yaeyama archipelago. Blessed with Japan’s best beaches, it is particularly popular with families since the beaches at Fusaki and Maezato are net-protected. Located 1,250 miles (2,000 kilometers) south of Tokyo, Ishigaki may not have the shrines and temples that other Japanese cities have, but it does have an exuberant nightlife for visitors who have the energy after a day of beachcombing, water sports or climbing Mount Nosoko.

8. Kanazawa

In the mid-nineteenth century Kanazawa was Japan’s 4th largest city, built around a grand castle and the beautiful garden. Today, the capital of Ishikawa Prefecture continues to cultivate the arts and contains an attractive old town. Having escaped bombing during World War II, traditional inner-city areas, such as Nagamachi with its samurai houses and the charming geisha teahouse district of Higashi Chaya, remain intact and are a joy to wander around.

7. Hiroshima (Where to Stay)
Hiroshimaflickr/DoNotLick

Hiroshima, located on Honshu Island, is younger than many Japanese cities, less than 500 years old, but its fate was forever sealed in history on August 6, 1945, when it became the first city in the world to have an atomic bomb dropped on it. Thus, the city’s attractions center around peace: Peace Park, Peace Memorial and Peace Memorial Museum. The city also has attractions that invoke more pleasant thoughts, such as Hiroshima Castle and the sunken garden of Shukkein-en.

6. Kamakura (Where to Stay)

Located on the coast less than an hour from Tokyo, Kamakura was once an important town, the seat of a military government that ruled Japan for a hundred years. Today, it’s a relaxed seaside resort sometimes called the Kyoto of eastern Japan because of its many temples and shrines. Its most famous sight is the Daibutsu, a huge bronze Buddha statue surrounded by trees, but the town’s ancient Zen temples are equally compelling.

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